Bridging the Divide: A Call to Close the Care Gap

Ramu (name changed), a 42-year-old farmer from rural part of North Karnataka, was diagnosed with cancer of the tongue. The nearest specialized cancer treatment centre was 600 kilometres away and took 11 hours to reach. Ramu is unable to speak and is in extreme pain. He and his wife have travelled to Bengaluru, hoping for better treatment. At the cancer center they have been told that further tests need to be conducted before they start him on chemotherapy. Having no place to stay nor enough money, they are living on the streets. In addition, they are worried about their young children, who are currently staying with their relatives. The Global Cancer Observatory (GLOBOCAN) survey estimates that there were 19.3 million new cancer cases globally in 2020. In India, we had 14,61,427 new cancer cases in 2022. Ramu is just one of them. During their 10-day stay in Bengaluru, Ramu and his wife struggled to understand the name of the cancer, its extent, its implications, treatment choices, and the likelihood of progression. They neither had the financial, intellectual, or social capital to manage this dreaded disease. All the while, Ramu continued to struggle with pain and the stress of not being able to speak. The healthcare system, oblivious to the suffering of Ramu and his wife, continued to forge ahead with their ‘one size fits all’, ‘evidence-based’ attempt at managing the cancer. The wait for the government insurance, the multitudes of documents that needed to be produced ensured that Ramu’s treatment got inexorably delayed. By the time Ramu’s treatment commenced, the couple had exhausted their resources, physically and emotionally, were demotivated, and abandoning all hope, they headed back home. Mr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. “Don’t ever question the value of volunteers. Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers, the Titanic was built by professionals.”-Dave GlynnMr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man. Mr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. As I was growing up, my parents were constantly searching for ways to effectively channelize my boundless energy and passion, ensuring that I could make a meaningful impact on society. During this process, I learned different skills, participated in various sports, gained insights and knowledge, engaged in community services, and volunteered for various social causes. The exposure to selfless service for others shaped my understanding of the need for and importance of giving back to society.“Don’t ever question the value of volunteers. Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers, the Titanic was built by professionals.”-Dave GlynnMr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. “Don’t ever question the value of volunteers. Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers, the Titanic was built by professionals.”-Dave GlynnMr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man. Mr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. Age is just a number, as they say. Cancer can affect people of any age group. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer in the world and the most common type found in India. As a palliative care specialist, when asked why they didn’t consider cancer as a possibility when experiencing symptoms, patients often respond with, “I thought it was just menopause, and irregular bleeding is a common sign of menopause. I never thought it could be something so serious.”As I was growing up, my parents were constantly searching for ways to effectively channelize my boundless energy and passion, ensuring that I could make a meaningful impact on society. During this process, I learned different skills, participated in various sports, gained insights and knowledge, engaged in community services, and volunteered for various social causes. The exposure to selfless service for others shaped my understanding of the need for and importance of giving back to society.Mr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. “Don’t ever question the value of volunteers. Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers, the Titanic was built by professionals.”-Dave GlynnMr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man. Mr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. As I was growing up, my parents were constantly searching for ways to effectively channelize my boundless energy and passion, ensuring that I could make a meaningful impact on society. During this process, I learned different skills, participated in various sports, gained insights and knowledge, engaged in community services, and volunteered for various social causes. The exposure to selfless service for others shaped my understanding of the need for and importance of giving back to society.“Don’t ever question the value of volunteers. Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers, the Titanic was built by professionals.”-Dave GlynnMr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. “Don’t ever question the value of volunteers. Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers, the Titanic was built by professionals.”-Dave GlynnMr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man. Mr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. Ramu (name changed), a 42-year-old farmer from rural part of North Karnataka, was diagnosed with cancer of the tongue. The nearest specialized cancer treatment centre was 600 kilometres away and took 11 hours to reach. Ramu is unable to speak and is in extreme pain. He and his wife have travelled to Bengaluru, hoping for better treatment. At the cancer center they have been told that further tests need to be conducted before they start him on chemotherapy. Having no place to stay nor enough money, they are living on the streets. In addition, they are worried about their young children, who are currently staying with their relatives. The Global Cancer Observatory (GLOBOCAN) survey estimates that there were 19.3 million new cancer cases globally in 2020. In India, we had 14,61,427 new cancer cases in 2022. Ramu is just one of them. During their 10-day stay in Bengaluru, Ramu and his wife struggled to understand the name of the cancer, its extent, its implications, treatment choices, and the likelihood of progression. They neither had the financial, intellectual, or social capital to manage this dreaded disease. All the while, Ramu continued to struggle with pain and the stress of not being able to speak. The healthcare system, oblivious to the suffering of Ramu and his wife, continued to forge ahead with their ‘one size fits all’, ‘evidence-based’ attempt at managing the cancer. The wait for the government insurance, the multitudes of documents that needed to be produced ensured that Ramu’s treatment got inexorably delayed. By the time Ramu’s treatment commenced, the couple had exhausted their resources, physically and emotionally, were demotivated, and abandoning all hope, they headed back home. Age is just a number, as they say. Cancer can affect people of any age group. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer in the world and the most common type found in India. As a palliative care specialist, when asked why they didn’t consider cancer as a possibility when experiencing symptoms, patients often respond with, “I thought it was just menopause, and irregular bleeding is a common sign of menopause. I never thought it could be something so serious.”Mr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. “Don’t ever question the value of volunteers. Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers, the Titanic was built by professionals.”-Dave GlynnMr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man. Mr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. As I was growing up, my parents were constantly searching for ways to effectively channelize my boundless energy and passion, ensuring that I could make a meaningful impact on society. During this process, I learned different skills, participated in various sports, gained insights and knowledge, engaged in community services, and volunteered for various social causes. The exposure to selfless service for others shaped my understanding of the need for and importance of giving back to society.“Don’t ever question the value of volunteers. Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers, the Titanic was built by professionals.”-Dave GlynnMr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. “Don’t ever question the value of volunteers. Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers, the Titanic was built by professionals.”-Dave GlynnMr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man. Mr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. Age is just a number, as they say. Cancer can affect people of any age group. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer in the world and the most common type found in India. As a palliative care specialist, when asked why they didn’t consider cancer as a possibility when experiencing symptoms, patients often respond with, “I thought it was just menopause, and irregular bleeding is a common sign of menopause. I never thought it could be something so serious.”As I was growing up, my parents were constantly searching for ways to effectively channelize my boundless energy and passion, ensuring that I could make a meaningful impact on society. During this process, I learned different skills, participated in various sports, gained insights and knowledge, engaged in community services, and volunteered for various social causes. The exposure to selfless service for others shaped my understanding of the need for and importance of giving back to society.Mr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. “Don’t ever question the value of volunteers. Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers, the Titanic was built by professionals.”-Dave GlynnMr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man. Mr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. As I was growing up, my parents were constantly searching for ways to effectively channelize my boundless energy and passion, ensuring that I could make a meaningful impact on society. During this process, I learned different skills, participated in various sports, gained insights and knowledge, engaged in community services, and volunteered for various social causes. The exposure to selfless service for others shaped my understanding of the need for and importance of giving back to society.“Don’t ever question the value of volunteers. Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers, the Titanic was built by professionals.”-Dave GlynnMr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year. “Don’t ever question the value of volunteers. Noah’s Ark was built by volunteers, the Titanic was built by professionals.”-Dave GlynnMr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man. Mr. Ram was 17 years old and far away from home in boarding school when he lost his father to a chronic illness. He was aware that his father was unwell but was not informed by his family about the rapidly declining condition. Ram was not informed about his father’s death for almost two months because the family knew he had important examinations to take in the upcoming months. When he was eventually told about his father’s passing, he was in shock, was angry at the family for keeping him in the dark, and felt they made decisions on his behalf, leaving him feeling lonely and abandoned in his grief. His mother and elders in the family told him, “Don’t cry like this; you are the man in this house, and you have to be strong.” Six years later, he is seen changing multiple jobs and facing rejection, which leaves him struggling to cope and confused about how he should be feeling as a man.Cancer burden continues to grow day by day worldwide, with an increased number of newly diagnosed cases and deaths each year.

Today, we stand on the threshold of World Cancer Day 2024 in solidarity with countless individuals like Ramu, who are not only battling a relentless adversary like cancer but are also victims of the gross inequities associated with cancer care. The statistics for cancer are grim in India. One in nine individuals is expected to get cancer in their lifetime, with every second person affected by cancer likely to die (mortality of >55%). Equally concerning is the fact that less than 30% of individuals in low-income countries have access to cancer treatment as compared to 90% in high-income countries. Differences in income and educational levels; geographical locations (urban-rural divide); discrimination based on ethnicity, race, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability and lifestyle; and poor infrastructure impact the cancer journey. Ramu not only needs treatment for cancer but also respite from the pain he is experiencing. They need emotional support and help in making healthcare decisions. In addition to oncological care, this couple needs palliative care and psycho-oncology support. Unfortunately, cancer care is very fragmented in India, with less than 4% of Indians having access to palliative care and even fewer having access to psycho-oncology and counselling services. Ramu and his wife abandoned treatment halfway and chose to go back home against medical advice. Ramu died at home two months later in agony, reiterating the narrative of cancer being an incurable disease. In the current scenario, the outcome of the illness depends upon who you are, where you live, and how much money you have.Today, we stand on the threshold of World Cancer Day 2024 in solidarity with countless individuals like Ramu, who are not only battling a relentless adversary like cancer but are also victims of the gross inequities associated with cancer care. The statistics for cancer are grim in India. One in nine individuals is expected to get cancer in their lifetime, with every second person affected by cancer likely to die (mortality of >55%). Equally concerning is the fact that less than 30% of individuals in low-income countries have access to cancer treatment as compared to 90% in high-income countries. Differences in income and educational levels; geographical locations (urban-rural divide); discrimination based on ethnicity, race, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability and lifestyle; and poor infrastructure impact the cancer journey. Ramu not only needs treatment for cancer but also respite from the pain he is experiencing. They need emotional support and help in making healthcare decisions. In addition to oncological care, this couple needs palliative care and psycho-oncology support. Unfortunately, cancer care is very fragmented in India, with less than 4% of Indians having access to palliative care and even fewer having access to psycho-oncology and counselling services. Ramu and his wife abandoned treatment halfway and chose to go back home against medical advice. Ramu died at home two months later in agony, reiterating the narrative of cancer being an incurable disease. In the current scenario, the outcome of the illness depends upon who you are, where you live, and how much money you have.Many people tend to assume that their health is fine and that their symptoms are minor issues, neglecting to take them seriously. India, being a developing country and a hub for IT, is amazing. However, not many people are aware of what cervical cancer is and how to prevent it. In the 21st century, where Chandrayaan (India’s lunar mission) is a great success, I believe it is important to spread awareness about cervical cancer to the general population.

In most countries worldwide, there are apparent gaps in cancer care, more so in low- and middle-income countries. The World Cancer Day 2024 theme emphasizes on the need to close these gaps. The key aims of celebrating this day on February 4th of every year are to raise awareness about cancer, improve education and knowledge about cancer, and press governments, policymakers and individuals worldwide to take action against the disease and improve the inequities in access and affordability of cancer care. The 3-year ‘Close the Care Gap’ campaign focused on the inequities in cancer care globally in its first year (2022), building new collaborations and alliances for better cancer care in its second year (2023), and challenging those in power to address and eliminate the inequities in its final year (2024). Compassionate and equitable cancer care involves being able to prevent cancer by educating, screening, and identifying cancer at an early stage, creating centres for quality cancer care that are easily accessible and affordable for all populations, coordinating care across different healthcare settings, improving access to palliative and supportive care, while also increasing access and availability of psycho-oncological services, and supporting patients and families throughout the cancer trajectory from diagnosis to end-of-life or survivorships. This campaign closely aligns with the Sustainable Development Goal of achieving Universal Health Coverage for all. To ‘Close the Care Gap”, healthcare providers, patients, caregivers, the general public, and the policymakers in government need to come together as one and speak in one voice. Let closing the care gap be not an abstract goal, but a tangible promise that we can fulfil together by joining hands with each other. In the spirit of humanity and compassion, let us pledge to bridge hearts and close the gaps, ensuring that people like Ramu do not have to fight alone. In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. I have been volunteering in many different ways from childhood and it has added valuable dimension to my personality. My experiences with volunteering know no boundaries – it transcends borders, cultures, and languages. It has also aided me in building trust and confidence between societies.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture. In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. Karunashraya has been instrumental in providing guidance and mentorship to youths. We, at Karunashraya, have been conducting the nursing aide training program with the aim of empowering young women to become independent individuals. The free-of-charge residential and training program with a minimum stipend has also motivated them to stay involved. The vibrant energy of the palliative care is credited to the youthful staff, comprising 75 percent of employees who are 25 years and below. Karunashraya has invested in youth education, promoted social responsibility, enabled financial independence, and aided in skill development, thus building and boosting self confidence among these women to face the challenges of the new century.I have been volunteering in many different ways from childhood and it has added valuable dimension to my personality. My experiences with volunteering know no boundaries – it transcends borders, cultures, and languages. It has also aided me in building trust and confidence between societies.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. I have been volunteering in many different ways from childhood and it has added valuable dimension to my personality. My experiences with volunteering know no boundaries – it transcends borders, cultures, and languages. It has also aided me in building trust and confidence between societies.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture. In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. According to current population data in India, there are 511.4 million women aged 15 years and above who are at risk of cervical cancer. More than 95% of cervical cancer cases are caused by the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV). Current estimates suggest that every year, 123,907 women in India are diagnosed with cervical cancer, and out of those, 77,348 die from the disease.Karunashraya has been instrumental in providing guidance and mentorship to youths. We, at Karunashraya, have been conducting the nursing aide training program with the aim of empowering young women to become independent individuals. The free-of-charge residential and training program with a minimum stipend has also motivated them to stay involved. The vibrant energy of the palliative care is credited to the youthful staff, comprising 75 percent of employees who are 25 years and below. Karunashraya has invested in youth education, promoted social responsibility, enabled financial independence, and aided in skill development, thus building and boosting self confidence among these women to face the challenges of the new century.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. I have been volunteering in many different ways from childhood and it has added valuable dimension to my personality. My experiences with volunteering know no boundaries – it transcends borders, cultures, and languages. It has also aided me in building trust and confidence between societies.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture. In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. Karunashraya has been instrumental in providing guidance and mentorship to youths. We, at Karunashraya, have been conducting the nursing aide training program with the aim of empowering young women to become independent individuals. The free-of-charge residential and training program with a minimum stipend has also motivated them to stay involved. The vibrant energy of the palliative care is credited to the youthful staff, comprising 75 percent of employees who are 25 years and below. Karunashraya has invested in youth education, promoted social responsibility, enabled financial independence, and aided in skill development, thus building and boosting self confidence among these women to face the challenges of the new century.I have been volunteering in many different ways from childhood and it has added valuable dimension to my personality. My experiences with volunteering know no boundaries – it transcends borders, cultures, and languages. It has also aided me in building trust and confidence between societies.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. I have been volunteering in many different ways from childhood and it has added valuable dimension to my personality. My experiences with volunteering know no boundaries – it transcends borders, cultures, and languages. It has also aided me in building trust and confidence between societies.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture. In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. In most countries worldwide, there are apparent gaps in cancer care, more so in low- and middle-income countries. The World Cancer Day 2024 theme emphasizes on the need to close these gaps. The key aims of celebrating this day on February 4th of every year are to raise awareness about cancer, improve education and knowledge about cancer, and press governments, policymakers and individuals worldwide to take action against the disease and improve the inequities in access and affordability of cancer care. The 3-year ‘Close the Care Gap’ campaign focused on the inequities in cancer care globally in its first year (2022), building new collaborations and alliances for better cancer care in its second year (2023), and challenging those in power to address and eliminate the inequities in its final year (2024). Compassionate and equitable cancer care involves being able to prevent cancer by educating, screening, and identifying cancer at an early stage, creating centres for quality cancer care that are easily accessible and affordable for all populations, coordinating care across different healthcare settings, improving access to palliative and supportive care, while also increasing access and availability of psycho-oncological services, and supporting patients and families throughout the cancer trajectory from diagnosis to end-of-life or survivorships. This campaign closely aligns with the Sustainable Development Goal of achieving Universal Health Coverage for all. To ‘Close the Care Gap”, healthcare providers, patients, caregivers, the general public, and the policymakers in government need to come together as one and speak in one voice. Let closing the care gap be not an abstract goal, but a tangible promise that we can fulfil together by joining hands with each other. In the spirit of humanity and compassion, let us pledge to bridge hearts and close the gaps, ensuring that people like Ramu do not have to fight alone. According to current population data in India, there are 511.4 million women aged 15 years and above who are at risk of cervical cancer. More than 95% of cervical cancer cases are caused by the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV). Current estimates suggest that every year, 123,907 women in India are diagnosed with cervical cancer, and out of those, 77,348 die from the disease.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. I have been volunteering in many different ways from childhood and it has added valuable dimension to my personality. My experiences with volunteering know no boundaries – it transcends borders, cultures, and languages. It has also aided me in building trust and confidence between societies.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture. In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. Karunashraya has been instrumental in providing guidance and mentorship to youths. We, at Karunashraya, have been conducting the nursing aide training program with the aim of empowering young women to become independent individuals. The free-of-charge residential and training program with a minimum stipend has also motivated them to stay involved. The vibrant energy of the palliative care is credited to the youthful staff, comprising 75 percent of employees who are 25 years and below. Karunashraya has invested in youth education, promoted social responsibility, enabled financial independence, and aided in skill development, thus building and boosting self confidence among these women to face the challenges of the new century.I have been volunteering in many different ways from childhood and it has added valuable dimension to my personality. My experiences with volunteering know no boundaries – it transcends borders, cultures, and languages. It has also aided me in building trust and confidence between societies.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. I have been volunteering in many different ways from childhood and it has added valuable dimension to my personality. My experiences with volunteering know no boundaries – it transcends borders, cultures, and languages. It has also aided me in building trust and confidence between societies.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture. In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. According to current population data in India, there are 511.4 million women aged 15 years and above who are at risk of cervical cancer. More than 95% of cervical cancer cases are caused by the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV). Current estimates suggest that every year, 123,907 women in India are diagnosed with cervical cancer, and out of those, 77,348 die from the disease.Karunashraya has been instrumental in providing guidance and mentorship to youths. We, at Karunashraya, have been conducting the nursing aide training program with the aim of empowering young women to become independent individuals. The free-of-charge residential and training program with a minimum stipend has also motivated them to stay involved. The vibrant energy of the palliative care is credited to the youthful staff, comprising 75 percent of employees who are 25 years and below. Karunashraya has invested in youth education, promoted social responsibility, enabled financial independence, and aided in skill development, thus building and boosting self confidence among these women to face the challenges of the new century.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. I have been volunteering in many different ways from childhood and it has added valuable dimension to my personality. My experiences with volunteering know no boundaries – it transcends borders, cultures, and languages. It has also aided me in building trust and confidence between societies.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture. In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. Karunashraya has been instrumental in providing guidance and mentorship to youths. We, at Karunashraya, have been conducting the nursing aide training program with the aim of empowering young women to become independent individuals. The free-of-charge residential and training program with a minimum stipend has also motivated them to stay involved. The vibrant energy of the palliative care is credited to the youthful staff, comprising 75 percent of employees who are 25 years and below. Karunashraya has invested in youth education, promoted social responsibility, enabled financial independence, and aided in skill development, thus building and boosting self confidence among these women to face the challenges of the new century.I have been volunteering in many different ways from childhood and it has added valuable dimension to my personality. My experiences with volunteering know no boundaries – it transcends borders, cultures, and languages. It has also aided me in building trust and confidence between societies.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity. I have been volunteering in many different ways from childhood and it has added valuable dimension to my personality. My experiences with volunteering know no boundaries – it transcends borders, cultures, and languages. It has also aided me in building trust and confidence between societies.In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture. In the grandeur of life, the cry “Gone but not forgotten” is a voice that speaks to every heart. But for men, facing the complexities of bereavement is a challenge of its own. In a culture that thrives on stoicism, navigating grief is a path less traveled. It is a walk of unspoken struggles and a journey fraught with societal expectations. This blog explores the complexities of men’s mental health in relation to bereavement and explores why it is so important to break the silence and create a healing culture.Distress is an unpleasant experience of a physical, mental, social, or spiritual nature. It can make it difficult for someone to cope with having cancer, its symptoms, treatment, both curative as well as side effects. This  affects their survivorship and hence it impacts the entire family.  Distress affect one across the range of experience. It varies from mild to severe, which includes sadness, fear, and helplessness with intensity.

Author: Seema R Rao Dr. Lakshmi Abhishek Krishnan Author: Shilpi AgrawalSeema R RaoAuthor: Dr. Lakshmi Abhishek Krishnan Dr. Lakshmi Abhishek Krishnan Author: Shilpi Agrawal

Associate Director (Education and Research)
Karunashraya Institute for Palliative Care Education and Research (KIPCER)
Bengaluru, India
Honorary Tutor, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, UK